How I Set Up My Fuji Camera

We’re lucky with Fuji cameras in that we can assign almost every button to another function should we need to. Using the X-20 you have even more user definable buttons than newer models, meaning you rarely have to go into the system menus. I’ll run through exactly how I’ve set up my camera, which I believe is the best way, that makes sense when out in the field taking photographs. Even if you have a different camera, this should be of use to you.

I must note first that for the majority of the time I shoot in aperture priority mode, as I’m usually moving around in different directions with ever changing light, so manual mode just slows me down. Also, I find that with the amazing EV dial, tweaking exposure is fast and reliable, giving me all the benefits of manual, but at the twist of one dial.

Starting at the top of the camera, the function button is set to the photometry setting. It’s a setting I rarely use, but it’s at a position that’s out of the way, but easy enough to get to should it be needed.

Next we move to the front and back wheel dials. The front wheel dial adjusts my shutter speed when spun, while the back wheel dial adjusts my aperture on lenses that don’t have an aperture ring. When the rear wheel dial is pressed in, it sets up the ISO. With this setup, selecting ISO and adjusting it can all be done in the viewfinder with your thumb on on button (wheel)… Super fast and no faffing required, just thumb in one position!

The AE-L button is set to back button focus, while the AF-L is set to focus zoom, so that I can quickly zoom in on the subject to check focus, regardless of using a manual or automatic lens.

The four direction keys, which are extremely useful are set for my most used settings. Up selects focus mode, Right for eye/face detect, Down for select focus point and Left for film simulation select.

With this setup you never have to leave the viewfinder, and everything is accessible with the thumb or first finger.

For changing focus point position I did try having the touch screen active and using the right half of the screen as a trackpad. Although it worked well, my nose would constantly move the position of the focus point, so my touch screen yes now turned off.

For quickly entering back button focus mode, I simply switch the front switch from S or C to M, and then use the AE-L button (this button is better suited to the thumb position).

So, that’s the button configuration dealt with, and now onto some basic settings which I generally use to ensure the best photographic experience. Most of these settings are set once and untouched for the majority of the time, and they have served me really well with my Fuji camera.

The first thing I have set is the shutter type, which I set to M+E (mechanical + electronic). This allows me to never worry about over exposing as if the shutter speed goes above 1/4000 the electronic shutter kicks in, meaning even on a sunny day using a wide aperture like F/1.4 shooting into the sun will result in a properly exposed shot.

I have my auto ISO set to a minimum ISO of 200 (base) and a high of 6400 (unless I’m shooting indoor where I will use the 12800 setting. My minimum shutter speed is set to 1/60th for the most part, as I feel this captures most things without to many issues (although I set it higher when my children are involved). If I’m shooting in an environment where light is not an issue, I generally use manual ISO.

I have my Q1 selection set to my default settings, this is a quick setting which I select before or after every shoot, it sets up my film simulation, ISO, focus and exposure modes etc, all to a point where I know things will work if needed in an instant. My Q2-Q7 buttons are used for various film simulation recipes or I’ll set Q2 (Or Q7) specifically before going out if there’s something I think I might need quickly (is if going to shoot animals or dark environments).

I always use auto white balance and that is never changed in general shooting as I feel for the most part, the camera always gets it right. And that is the point with modern cameras, you spend a fortune on them, so there’s nothing wrong with them doing some of the work for you. Make the most of what you’re camera can do by letting it go things for you!

— I was a semi professional photographer who has now decided to take things a little easier and just enjoy photography again. I run photography meets, have one-2-one sessions and run various groups for photographers. The information in this particular blog is based on my general set-up and should be useful for most people with any camera. If you like it, have any comments etc, then please leave a comment or like this blog as it really helps!

9 thoughts on “How I Set Up My Fuji Camera

  1. Mr Mark Adams, nice post from you. Could you please, clarify what are your default settings used for C1? So far, I have set all 7 customs based on kev mullins recipe…per the you-tube site. I may change some of these later, whch is why I am interested in your set-up. Kevin uses ref to parr, meyoritz and padilla, and his own recipes….seemed a good start for me. I have the XE3…I turn off touch screen, as too much going on so I try to keep it simple. thank you in anticipation.

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    1. Of course. I shall give a full run down in the morning for you (when next to camera). Thank you for your comments.

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    2. Mart, my Q1 default settings are Auto ISO3200 (minimum shutter 1/60), Classic Chrome, Auto White balance, everything set at 0, centre point focus. I like to keep at pure Classic Chrome before I start, as that’s my favourite straight out of camera film simulation when I just pick up the camera. My other Q settings are my own (Q2) Acros Faded, (Q3) Acros Deep, (Q4) FujiChrome R100, (Q5) Leica M10 Mono, (Q6) Deep Skies and finally (Q7) Kodachrome. I tend to use R100, Leica and Kodachrome the most depending on the situation I’m in. Q2 will change often depending on what I am trying out at the time, or if it is a simulation I am currently developing. My camera will always be set to CL and Aperture Priority on the dials.

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    1. This will be set on your Q button on the back of your camera. Basically, everyones defaults may be different. Press the Q button once, and then when the screen changes, hold the Q button down for a second and it will give you the chance to edit Q1-Q7. Each of these are user definable settings,my Q1 default settings are Auto ISO3200 (minimum shutter 1/60), Classic Chrome, Auto White balance, everything set at 0, centre point focus. I like to keep at pure Classic Chrome before I start, as that’s my favourite straight out of camera film simulation when I just pick up the camera. My other Q settings are my own (Q2) Acros Faded, (Q3) Acros Deep, (Q4) FujiChrome R100, (Q5) Leica M10 Mono, (Q6) Deep Skies and finally (Q7) Kodachrome. I tend to use R100, Leica and Kodachrome the most depending on the situation I’m in. Q2 will change often depending on what I am trying out at the time, or if it is a simulation I am currently developing. My camera will always be set to CL and Aperture Priority on the dials.

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