Life In MGA Sepia+

Sepia is one of those overlooked film simulations that not many people use, so this film simulation recipe is just for a bit of artistic licence. Deep, contrasty and unique, MGA Sepia+ is Sepia, and then some! This simulation gives you a really really old-skool look, and it’s hard to control the highlights and shadows, but when you do, you can get some great results!

This simulation is for X-Trans IV sensors, but may work to some extent on older sensors. Here’s just a small sample of images used to test this recipe. Feel free to adjust it to your needs, the highlight and shadow settings especially may need changing if you can’t control the highlights.

Sepia Vs Sepia+
Sepia Vs Sepia+
Sepia Vs Sepia+
Sepia Vs Sepia+
Sepia Vs Sepia+

Visit Sepia+ and many more film simulation recipes by clicking this link

New Fujifilm Film Simulation Recipes Update For December

Over the course of the next week there will be three new film simulation recipes released for Fujifilm X-Trans IV cameras. This brings the total site film simulation catalogue up to 29 (20 X-Trans III and 9 X-Trans IV).

A classic film stock based on AGFA film.
A recipe based on good old fashioned instant film.
An old film stock type recipe, with a golden glow.

And once these are released, there will be a final release on Christmas Day of something very special (if all goes well!)

I do all this for free, but if you would like to help out, then I happily accept PayPal payments to mgadams1970@gmail.com The time and the cost of the website are very real, and any little help towards my work is welcome and much appreciated.

Llanelli North Dock Photography Meet (And Film Sim Test)

Tuesday 24th November I headed out to Llanelli North Dock with my photography group for our weekly shoot. This was a place we’d never been. A reclaimed dock and Waterside area with some stunning scenery. The visit took us not just to the beach, but there was a lovely lake worth many wild birds, plus a wooded area.

It’s always nice visiting new areas, but on days where I have a lot of things to try it, it’s even more exciting. I had a number of new film simulations I’d been working on, plus some base ideas for them. For this I shot both raw and jpeg and loaded my camera with the simulations.

As you can see, these simulations were put together by myself, mostly for trial on the visit as I knew it would possibly allow some experimenting. The end results actually had me change things up a little, but that’s the best way to get perfect results.

Here are the images from today, all straight out of camera (viewing them full screen makes a better experience), they were just resized in Photoscape X Pro with no other changes. A follow up blog showing some of these in print will follow in the next few days. The equipment used on this shoot was my new Fujifilm X-T3 along with the Fuji 15-45mm and 50-230mm lenses.

It was such a wonderful day, and I’m more than happy with the simulations as they are. They will be put onto the website in the coming days, as time is limited a minute. As you can see, I got excited by my Portra recipe, so there us quite a few images using that!

If you’d like to join us at Great Photography Walks South Wales, or just join me on my Fujifilm photography journey, please feel free to add me to Facebook, Twitter or Instagram.

So comments, likes and subscribes to the website and blog are most welcomed, and give me the inspiration to keep doing what I’m doing! I respond to all comments.

Thank you for reading, and look out soon for more blogs!

Portra, Vintage Mono, Eterna XTra and Leica Q2 Monochrom Cool will all be available in the next few days from the Fuji section of the website. Leica-Like V2 will follow once I have found a more suitable testing ground

— I’m currently looking for testers to test out the film simulations I do, as this will help me perfect them more in different scenarios. Please contact me if you would like to help.

Lockdown Street Photography: Port Talbot with Fred Herzog Kodachrome

Today was the first chance that I had to really go out and test my new Fujifilm X-T3 and my new film recipe I’ve been working on based on Fred Herzog’s Kodachrome images.

I’ve really liked the look of his work, and although it was Kodachrome slide film that he used, he had a certain look with to me is simply intriguing and stunning. Shooting the mundane, shooting the everyday things were all take for granted, the images came alive with the strong colours of the film.

So today I took these images. All colour is straight from camera, the only thing I edited was performing a crop to them and adding a border, so achieved in Snapseed.

These images were taken in strong sunlight. For this year I have not yet included any white balance shifts to the images. The full recipe will be coming to the website soon, and included in this blog when it is completed.

I would love feedback on these. You can view original images by Fred Herzog at This Website Please take into account, the time different, people’s clothes, images on buildings and almost everything was very different back then, which of course gives Frank’s images an altogether different look.

Storing Film Simulations on your Fujifilm (A simple guide)

One of the reasons we love and use Fujifilm cameras is because it’s easy to replicate old film stocks, invent new ones, and have more control over the image before we take the photo than any other camera. Some of us only ever shoot in these film simulations that we’ve made, others only use the stock Fujifilm film simulations, while others shoot in raw and then add these simulations using Fuji’s X Raw Studio on their computers.

This guide will take you though a typical Fujifilm X camera set-up, although there may well be differences to which camera you use. The basic idea will be the same regardless of what you use. This is NOT a technical post, and not a discussion on white balance, just a way to help you get to the settings quickly.

Step 1: The Look

The first step is to decide what look you are after. Are you looking to replicate old film stock? If so, One Camera One Lens has a page dedicated to over 15 unique film simulations and recipes. Take a look once you’ve read this article!

You’ll notice that these recipes have various settings that you must alter to change the look of your finished image. Each of these settings, when altered, changes the look of the photographs you take.

Step 2: Enter Your Settings

I’ve seen many articles taking you the long way off entering these settings, this is the quick way and is simple.

1. Press your “Q” button – the screen will change to your Quick settings.
2. Press and HOLD your “Q” button for about a second – you’ll be given a list of C1-C7.
3. Scroll to a C number you want to use.
4. Press “OK” – You’ll be greeted by the various settings. Scroll through them and change them as you need.
5. Press “Back” and it will ask you to save the recipe.

And that is how simple it is. If you’ve disabled the “Q” button for any reason, you can get to step 2 by going into the menus. (Found at IQ>Select Custom Setting)

(Your menus may look slightly different)

Press the “Q” Button to get here.
Press and HOLD the Q button for a second to get here, and choose your Custom number.
Inside this menu you can go ahead and change your settings!

For most people, this will be more than enough to complete the setup of a Film Simulation, however, you may want to add an R/B offset for your white balance, and this is where the fun really begins!

Step 3: The White Balance R/B Offset Conundrum

If you do not need to change the Red and Blue (R/B) offset for your recipe, you can skip this part of the instructions.

This is a step that most confuses new and not so new Fujifilm users. While you can alter many aspects of the White Balance in the Q editing of your recipes, you can’t assign a R/B offset directly into the customising function (in some cameras).

To adjust your R & B values (should you wish) you must adjust one of your three Custom White Balance settings, or other White Balance options, please see the notes on this below the instructions.

To do this, simply follow this instructions:

1. Press your “Menu” button.
2. Scroll down to “White Balance”
3. Choose Auto, Custom 1-3 (whichever you want to assign the R/B offset if needed and not using Auto WB) or any of the other settings such as Kelvin, Daylight, Shade etc. – Press the right arrow/joystick to enter the offset mode.
4. If in the Custom 1-3 setting you Press “OK” on the first screen, it will bypass it (and use the last value*) and you can then enter the Red and Blue values.

* To get a correct white balance if you have changed it in the past, you can point your camera at a white object filling the screen, and then press the shutter release to capture this White Balance. Alternatively you can adjust the offset in the “Auto” section and this will need to be changed each time you change settings to a new simulation. Auto, Kelvin, Daylight, Shade etc can all only have one R/B offset attached. Yes… I know it’s confusing!

(Your menus may look slightly different – Older X cameras may be missing the offset option)

Open the menu and go to “IQ” and then down to “White Balance” . *Choosing “Auto” will allow you to change the R & B values and give them auto WB. This will need to be changed for each Film Simulation. *Choosing “Custom 1-3” will give you the option to offset based on a White Balance that has been set by you when asked to press the shutter below. *Remember when saving your recipes you can only set ONE WB offset per WB setting (Auto, Custom, Daylight etc).

You’ll need to remember which Custom White Balance is for which recipe, as you’ll need to assign it to that recipe.

** White Card Technique **
To assign a custom white balance correctly, the manual states to point your camera and fill the screen with a white object when confronted with the “Shutter: New WB” option. This will then set your white balance for that environment.

Step 4: Use them!

Once your C1-C7 are full, get out and use them! Ideally I would set up my camera so that C1 is a default setting, with just a plain, untouched film simulation, with the ISO settings etc that you know you can rely on, and then have C2-C7 as film simulation edits.

Conclusion

It’s great fun shooting in film simulations, if you shoot in raw and jpeg, you’ll have even more options as you can take the raw file into Fuji X Raw Studio and choose different film simulations (another blog entry coming soon on this).

Don’t be afraid to experiment, and if you want the full experience, don’t forget to print your images! The film simulations you use from the internet are great starting points, and sometimes a little tweak or two can make all the difference if you’re not quite happy with the results.

Don’t forget to check out our main page which hosts film simulations, plus like and comment if you have found this useful, as it really helps me out!

— There are different variants of software in each camera, this guide is a general one and your camera may have more or less options, but the general idea should be the same in each case.